By Susan Ning, Peng Heyue, Yang Yang, Qiu Weiqing, Sarah Eder, and Guo Shaoyi

Introduction

On 15 November 2011, Qihoo issued proceedings against Tencent in the Guangdong Higher Court, asserting that Tencent had abused its dominant position, marking the beginning of the first anti-monopoly case in the internet arena. Qihoo lost the first trial and appealed. On 16 October 2014, the Supreme Court handed down its final decision, rejecting Qihoo’s appeal and upholding the first-instance court judgment. This was the first anti-monopoly case heard by the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court’s judgment elaborates detailed fundamental principles of anti-monopoly law, in particular in the context of abuse of dominance, which offers guidance and rules for future anti-monopoly litigation, especially those concerning abuse of dominance.
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By Susan Ning and Yun Wang

On 29 December 2011, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology ("MIIT") finally promulgated the Various Provisions on Regulating the Order of Internet Information Service Market ("Rules").  Viewed by many as been driven by the QQ/360 disputes in late 2010, the Rules mainly set out the code of conducts for an internet information service provider ("IISP") vis-à-vis its competitors and consumers. The Rules also create a dispute resolution mechanism between IISPs.


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By Susan Ning and Yin Ranran

On 27 July 2011, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology ("MIIT") issued for public comments draft rules entitled Provisions on Administration of Internet Information Services (Draft for Comments) ("Draft Rules").

The Draft Rules are based on an earlier draft entitled Interim Rules for Supervision and Management of Internet Information Service Market ("Interim Rules") released by MIIT on 12 January 2011.1   The Draft Rules mainly set out the code of conducts for an internet information service provider ("IISP") vis-à-vis its competitors and consumers.
 


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By Susan Ning, Liu Jia and Yin Ranran
The QQ / 360 battle broken out towards the end of 2010 (see our article entitled "The QQ / 360 Disputes – Who, What, Where, When and Preliminary Antitrust Analysis") has stirred lasting and heated discussions about anti-monopoly issues in the emerging Internet industry in China. 
 

About one month ago, Renmin University of China organized the thirteenth Anti-Monopoly Law Summit Forum, which was focused on discussion of fair competition in the Internet industry of China and protection of netizens’ interests.  Officials from various government agencies, such as the Law Committee of the National People’s Congress, Legislative Affairs of the State Council, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology ("MIIT"), the State of Administration for Industry and Commerce ("SAIC’), the Ministry of Commerce, and the National Development and Reform Commission, as well as judges from the Supreme People’s Court participated in the forum..


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