By Edmund Wan and Alex Ma  King & Wood Mallesons’ Hong Kong office.

The 21st century can arguably be described as an era of collaboration and cooperation.  A tear-down of a smartphone or personal computer for example would reveal that its components are sourced and manufactured in multiple countries. These parts are then assembled into the final product and sold worldwide. This is international business at its absolute finest. 
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By Peter Bullock, Neil Carabine, Urszula McCormack and Donovan Ferguson. King & Wood Mallesons’ Hong Kong office.

We gathered senior legal, IT and infrastructure professionals representing transport, TMT, energy and consulting businesses for a roundtable discussion in Hong Kong (on an unattributable basis) around the opportunities for, and blockers to, Smart City development. We found reasons for optimism that Smart City technology would win through, along with frustration at the pace of progress.
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By John Lo, Partner, Corporate, King & Wood–Hong Kong

Nurturing the growth of a science and technology focused sector became a significant part of the government policies of the first post-1997 administration. Under the guidance of the late Professor Tien Chang-lin, former chancellor of University of California, Berkeley, the government issued a technology blueprint for Hong Kong shortly after the changeover, which led to a new period of innovation and growth in the tech sector.


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Interviewed by Serwat Perwaiz, Editor of King & Wood’s Publication Group

As China’s economic and social presence on electronic forms of communication continues to develop and expand, the country’s regulatory bodies are stepping up to the challenge to keep pace with the new developments. We are lucky to have Dr. Martin Cave, Professor and Director of the Centre for Management under Regulation, Warwick Business School, to provide us his comments on the hot topics of Technology and the Internet.

When asked about his key areas of interest, he commented that he was particularly interested in “reform and liberalisation of the radio spectrum, which can support the amazing growth of voice and broadband wireless technologies we have seen in the past decade.” He went on to discuss how the standard model in Europe and the United States, which “relies on maximising competition and reducing regulation to the minimum, with a relatively small role for government policy and government subsidy” differs significantly from models in Asian countries where “government policy is a much stronger driver.”


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