By Alex Maschmedt & Rebecca Searle King & Wood Mallesons’ Melbourne office.

As driverless vehicles become more sophisticated and their economic and societal benefits become more widely accepted, competition is heating up between Australia’s State Governments (which are responsible for setting road rules and managing road infrastructure) to attract trials of driverless vehicles on their roads.

If you are developing Autonomous Vehicle technology or infrastructure, or looking to apply it in your business, the success of implementation will rest heavily on your (and your supplier’s) ability to test this piece of innovation. Understanding the legislative regimes that apply to testing in Australia will help you to make sure your tests are compliant and you can maximise the benefits of that testing. 
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This article was written by Monique Carroll with the assistance of Philippa Robinson.

As foreshadowed in our article Staying Ahead of the Curve on Anti-Bribery and Corruption in Australia, the Australian Government has now introduced the Crimes Legislation Amendment (Combatting Corporate Crime) Bill 2017 (Cth) (“Bill”) into parliament which clarifies and increases the scope of conduct caught by foreign bribery offences and introduces a scheme encouraging self-reporting of breaches. 
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By Meg UtterbackDaisy Mallett, Holly Blackwell, James McKenzie, Josephine Lao, and Ma Xiao.

China has been at the forefront of a number of recent developments in the dispute resolution space. One notable development is the announcement by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) of its new rules governing the arbitration of international investment disputes (Rules) and the CIETAC Investment Dispute Resolution Centre in Beijing (CIETAC IDRC), the default centre to administer those Rules. According to CIETAC’s Secretary-General, the Rules seek to “fill the gap” between Chinese commercial and investment arbitration rules and develop and promote the international investment arbitration practice in China[1].
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By Louis Chiam King & Wood Mallesons’Melbourne office.

The Australian energy markets are in a state of turmoil. The regulatory and governance arrangements in electricity and gas that have served us well for two decades are facing a host of challenges. From sudden increases in electricity and gas prices and a spike in unplanned outages, through to the increasing calls for more action on carbon emissions and the rise of disruptive new technologies, it seems pressure is everywhere.
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By Scott Heezen  King & Wood Mallesons’ Sydney office.

A number of tax concessions are available for Australian investment vehicles that qualify as managed investment trusts (MITs) for tax purposes. These concessions are designed to encourage investment into Australia, particularly Australian real estate, by both resident and non-resident investors.

A trust must satisfy a number of requirements in order for it to qualify as a MIT and access these concessions (download Investing Down Under: A Guide for Global Real Estate Investors in English or Chinese for a list of requirements). 
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By Monique Carroll and Jessica Bounds King&WoodMallesons’ Melbourne office

Australia’s regulatory landscape is constantly changing and companies must stay ahead of the curve. In the anti-bribery and corruption space, a large number of legislative changes have been proposed which, if introduced, will significantly increase the level of vigilance required by companies.
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By Alex Maschmedt, Louise Yun King & Wood Mallesons

The National Transport Commission (NTC) has released a discussion paper outlining four regulatory options to govern the safety of driverless cars and other autonomous vehicles in Australia. These include:

  1. Continuing the current approach
  2. Self-certification
  3. Pre-market approval
  4. Accreditation

These proposals mark an important step in developing a complete regulatory framework to support the large-scale roll-out of automated vehicles in the near future. The NTC is currently seeking feedback on each of the options proposed, along with any other issues that may arise in the regulation of driverless car technology. Subsequently, the NTC will formulate recommendations to submit to Australian transport ministers in November 2017.

This article evaluates the four regulatory options in light of current Australian practices surrounding vehicle safety and governance.
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By Odette Adams, Christina Crossman and Lauren Murphy  King & Wood Mallesons

​The Finkel Review into the Future Security of the National Electricity Market was released on 9 June. The Report makes some 50 policy recommendations to address the so-called “energy trilemma” – providing affordable, reliable and low emissions electricity for the country.

We have reviewed the recommendations by sector to bring you the probable, real-world implications of this “Blueprint for the Future”. The detail is in the Report, however, and we suggest reading the relatively short sections before each recommendation to understand them fully. 
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